Research

Most people (social science researchers among them) think of race or ethnic group as something that doesn’t change, and which we have no control over – a ‘time invariant’ or ‘stable’ characteristic we inherited from our parents. But for people described variously as ‘multiracial’, ‘mixed’ or of ‘multiple ethnicity’, ethnic options are real, and ethnic change is common. I am currently completing a PhD at the London School of Economics on the predictors of ethnic choice and change in census and survey data, analysing some large-scale datasets and interviewing the kinds of British ‘mixed’ people who have previously been overlooked in qualitative research. This includes white-identified people with a non-white parent, older people, and working-class people. My sexy big datasets are the ONS Longitudinal Study (a longitudinally linked 1% sample of the Census) and the UK Household Longitudinal Study (‘Understanding Society’). Feel free to contact me with any questions about my research.

Working papers
Mok, T.M. (2018). Predictors of ethnic change for mixed people in the United Kingdom: Analysis of the ONS Longitudinal Study. (Draft working paper presented at BSPS 2017 & PAA 2017).

Mok, T.M. (2018). Predictors of ethnic choice for mixed people in the UK: Cross-sectional analysis of the UK Household Longitudinal Study. (Draft working paper presented at PAA 2018)

Mok, T.M. (forthcoming). Who are the UK’s ‘hidden’ mixed population? Descriptive analysis of the UK Household Longitudinal Study.

Reports
Mok, T.M. (2018). Inside the box: Explaining ethnic choices in Understanding Society. Research report for an Understanding Society Associated Study (ISER/Essex University).

Published

Callanan, M., Mok, T.M., & Edovald, T. (2015). Evaluation of the Group Work Psychological Wellbeing and Work Feasibility Pilot. Department of Work and Pensions.

Kotecha, M., Callanan, M., Mok, T.M., & Edovald, T. (2015). Evaluation of the Telephone Support Psychological Wellbeing and Work Feasibility Pilot. Department of Work and Pensions.

Mok, T., Cornish, F., & Tarr, J. (2014). Too Much Information: Visual Research Ethics in the Age of Wearable Cameras. Integrative Psychological and Behavioral Science, 14pp.